Any STEM Majors Here?


#21

They didn’t mind eating your cooking; you might have minded a lot having to eat theirs. I hope they at least cleaned up (and I’m thinking you’re so organized, most of the cleanup would have been done as you cooked).

The world ain’t never gonna be equal.


#22

I’m studying biochem and physical anthropology! I’m working towards my PhD


#23

(Giggle) You’d think that Ph.D. candidates in science would understand stuff like raw chicken and bacteria, but no such luck. A field crew with which we shared housing got sick and had to go to the E-room, after eating undercooked chicken that had been left on the counter after the meal (they were all drunk) unnoticed 'til the next day after work, when they wolfed it down. I had to drive them. Ever driven fifty miles on a two-lane road, through National Park traffic, with five guys barfing their guts out and pooping?

I’ll never forget.

I set things up so that one of the guys would be my kitchen help each night. I’d teach him to cook a single dish. Some of the wives were grateful, but the rest were jealous. Whatever their husbands said on returning home made me seem like a threat.

Along with the photos of me in my river shorts.


#24

Computer Science, majoring in Software Engineering. Still don’t know if I want to proceed with it but my coding skills are coming in handy :slight_smile:


#25

Seems as if all science majors need to take quite a lot of computer science these days. So much of the practical work involves writing code, setting up computer analyses, etc.

I’m really good at running field projects and collecting good data in difficult or hazardous situations. But that’s only half the job. All the Ph.D. students I work with spend their winters poking a keyboard, which I rfuse to do. I’d rather keep my winters free for writing.

But it has definitely narrowed my potential in my field.


#26

The wives knew these guys. You can’t be blamed (not legitimately) for self-preservation. The wives were just stuck without being able to blame the right people, and blamed the nearest safe target. Sigh.

Or maybe they were hoping these guys had large insurance policies and weren’t coming home.


#27

I found the computational plasma physics place - between the theorists and the experimentalists - a very good niche, but yes, I did spend way too much time doing the gruntwork.

STEM careers are not free of the same kind of hierarchical infighting that exists in business, education, and the arts. I wasn’t good or interested in that.


#28

Im in engineering :raising_hand_woman:t6:, not sure if I’m going to graduate with software or computer science yet


#29

That’s true! I needed to help a friend once who is a chemistry major for her project. These skills could be learn just by getting your hands dirty. Dive in head first and learn on the job, and it gets better. At least from my experience… I have to admit, usually, some help on the basics before hand would require some time. But not much though.