Anyone over 35 there? Third edition

discussion

#887

Could be worse. He could have Tenser’s Slipped Disk.


#888

Yellow shirts? That brings up memories of my firefighting days.

We were issued yellow shirts of fire-resistant cloth along with olive-green trousers. The Nomex fabric is a bit stiff and after a few days absorbing sweat, layered with ashes and dirt, it tends to chafe.

I used to keep an eye out at thrift shops and yard sales, for old fire shirts of cotton, that get softer with age and repeated washing. Cotton’s not as fireproof as Nomex: it will smolder rather than catching fire, or melting like most of the new synthetics.


#889

Oh wow. I love Star Wars. Am a fan of the series.

We’d love to see the pics. Thanks :slight_smile:

@EmmaKatSpector You look so cool in that costume :slight_smile:


#890

:wink: That’s not me: just a photo snagged from the web.

The clothes are the same. The roll of flagging tells me that she’s going ahead to scout line, which can be risky. That sort of low, brushy stuff burns hot and with any sort of wind, the fire can really move fast.

So you have to move somewhat faster. . .


#891

Oh… I honestly thought that it was you. :wink: It’s nice learning about firefighting.


#892

Looking at the recent news, I’m glad not to be doing it anymore. A couple weeks digging and hacking, being shuttled to different fires, sleeping out in spike camps, etc. beats you up a bit.

When you blow your nose, it comes out black. The ash gets in your hair and your pores. After one stint, I spent half a day in a bathtub and there was a black ring afterward.


#893

Ours aren’t that stylish. We look like Minions - literally in some cases! And it’s definitely more stylish than my radhaz overalls!

For my damage control course, I was told to wear a string vest as well. Apparently, the pattern of skin left behind makes it easier to recover from burns. Although given my experience with radhaz instructors, I’m not sure if they were kidding me.


#894

Sometime after next weekend, then.


#895

Who are they? And what do they do?


#896

Do we accept those that are 35 and not over 35? Asking for a friend :slight_smile:


#897

They teach you how to work in areas that are radioactive or contaminated with radioactive materials.


#898

It’s not age that matters so much around here - more the attitude. So long as you don’t wake the Ancient Ones, we’ll be fine :smiley:


#899

I like it…


#900

Haha, thanks Leo! Funny you say that–I too came up with a concept of someone considering the Earth from an outsider’s view, but it’s executed slightly differently from your bewildered alien. I published my effort a couple days ago.


#901

National Geographic is hosting a short story contest right now called Planet or Plastic. You can find the info under “Contests” on Wattpad.


#902

My Nomex suit was a pale beige, the only colour the supplier had when I moved into serious racing in 1969. And as pale as it was, it never got sooty or sweaty; motor racing was a clean sport.

I fought two major British Columbia forest fires in the 1970s, but we weren’t issued any protective clothing other than coveralls and ill-fitting helmets.


#903

Besides the hardhat, yellow shirt, and green pants, we got aluminised fire shelters, like little shiny tents to protect you from extreme heat, which we called “shake & bakes.” I only had to use one once, when a big timber fire blew over our spike camp on a ridge. We all ran like hell and flopped down in a patch of boggy ground. It was scary, but the only injuries were from tripping and falling as we made the dash.

A common accessory is a web harness (belt and suspenders) with a case for your radio, water bottles, etc. You have to be a squad boss or higher to get one. I started carrying a couple decks of cards and a bag of loose change and small bills, for card games. Strictly forbidden, but fun.


#904

Essential to regain some semblance of calm.


#905

Funny how many guys seem to believe that a girl can’t play cards.

:smirk:


#906

Gives you a great advantage. :innocent: :sunglasses: