Anyone over 35 there? Third edition

discussion

#1967

Also, more likely in older-than-35-year-olds.

But my beta reader is in her first quarter-century - and has that background.


#1968

I try to avoid commenting on grammar. It’s too much like the day job. Editing the scrawlings of my fellow engineers is a nightmare for a pedant like myself. Instead, I prefer to comment on plot inconsistencies. Grammar is something that can be learnt, while technique is something that has to be developed.

Trying not to be a pedant is hard, though. Very hard.


#1969

I rarely comment on other people’s grammar - but I track mine like a heat-seeking missile.

But it is painful. And exhausting.

I appreciate those writers who make the effort, and a lot of them do. I’m apt to leave a little praise when someone uses, correctly, something that is a pet peeve.

To late for me to fix the world.


#1970

Apostrophe+s is my achilles heel! I don’t even know how it happened but at some point I started getting it wrong (a test reader brought it to my attention or I would never have known…) and now I over think it!!


#1971

No point in trying to fix it. We can only hope that our example will not be taken as badly as King Knut.


#1972

It’s easier if you realize there’s a hierarchy.

  1. FIRST, the apostrophe represents a missing letter (it is becomes it’s). Take those apart by replacing the letter.
    Example: It’s my dog Bowser’s bone. [It is my dog Bower’s bone.]

  2. the apostrophe indicates possessive.
    Example: The book of my friend becomes My friend’s book.
    BUT because it’s is already taken for it is, the possessive of it is its. THIS IS THE HARDEST ONE FOR MANY PEOPLE.
    Example: The dog picked up its bone. [The bone belongs to it.]

  3. In other uses, the symbol is NOT an apostrophe, but a single quote mark. In proper usage, putting single quotes around a word marks it as SUSPECT. There are MANY other uses of single quotes. Check a style book for those.
    Example: He had her ‘best’ interests at heart. [This means he had her worst interests at heart.]

And now you’re basically done.

And NEVER does an apostrophe go with a plural. (Okay, I could find you some complicated way where it LOOKS as if that’s what’s going on, but just ignore those.) Make PLURALS by adding S (usually if the word ends with a vowel - tree->trees) or ES (if the word ends with a consonant - fox - foxes).

I recommend the Handbook of Good English, Edward D. Johnson.


#1973

Is BDSM incompatible with Dystopian Romance?

Nope, I don’t so. I had not written on the genres but considering Mr. Goggle’s definition of dystopian, I would guess it’s required. :slight_smile: Included as part of a romantic relationship, it could even be considered as positive.

Dystopian - it describes an imaginary society that is as dehumanizing and as unpleasant as possible. George Orwell’s “Animal Farm,” for example, describes a dystopian society in which Napoleon, a pig, represents Joseph Stalin in a farmyard satire on Stalinist Russia and how power corrupts.

P.S. And thanks for the welcome greetings! I am still feeling my way around the interface though.


#1974

Mine are tenses. :sob: But I am trying… trying… trying.

Fortunately, my copy editor takes care of my mistakes. I do catch flak from her.


#1975

BUT because it’s is already taken for it is , the possessive of it is its . THIS IS THE HARDEST ONE FOR MANY PEOPLE.

This is what gets me. It is a 50/50 toss up and I almost always choose the wrong option!


#1976

I’ve 38 years old, used to work in marketing and communications, and I still have to stop and think about it’s vs its :rofl:


#1977

This is not the actual reason for why ITS in the possessive does not have an apostrophe.
Any noun can have the word IS truncated to an 'S. And any noun has as its possessive an 'S.

SUE’S DRIVING JOE’S CAR.
JOE’S DRIVING SUE’S CAR.

THE CAT’S EATING THE DOG’S FOOD.
THE DOG’S EATING THE CAT’S FOOD.

All nouns use an apostrophe to indicate possession.

SUE HAS A CAR. THE CAR IS SUE’S. IT IS SUE’S CAR.
THE CAT HAS FOOD. THE FOOD IS THE CAT’S. IT IS THE CAT’S FOOD.

Pronouns do not use an apostrophe to indicate possession.

I HAVE A CAR. THE CAR IS MINE. IT IS MY CAR.
SHE HAS A CAR. THE CAR IS HERS. IT IS HER CAR.

HE HAS FOOD, THE FOOD IS HIS. IT IS HIS FOOD.
IT HAS FOOD. THE FOOD IS ITS. IT IS ITS FOOD.

That is all. Cookies for desert. :slight_smile:


#1978

Break it’s into it is. If the sentence still makes sense, keep either version.

If the sentence no longer makes sense, remove the apostrophe.


#1979

I even edit my posts on WattPad—a grammar/spelling maniac, but I try not to take it out on others. Unless they annoy me.

Meanwhile, how about a warm slice of seed bread?

Got a really excellent bread knife for my birthday (the top one)!

Not expensive, but it does the job really well.


#1980

Bread looks so fresh :slight_smile: And when is your birthday? :slight_smile:


#1981

Recently. I don’t post my birthdate, ever.

But I’m one year closer to 35.


#1982

My daughter’s is today. Mine is in a few days. Happy birthday.,:slight_smile:


#1983

Even I celebrate my daughter’s birthday today :slight_smile:

Happy birthday in advance :slight_smile:


#1984

:slight_smile:


#1985

Remember - growing older is mandatory. Growing up? That’s optional! :smiley:


#1986

Think I mentioned that I’m part Mäori and study the language. A mate in New Zealand sent me this viddy of a poetry performance that I find moving.