Favorite foods and drinks (including pubs restaurants etc.)

food
random
drinks

#101

Try Scapa Skiren. Smooth and sweet. I can’t drink peaty whiskies. I swallowed too much loch water when I was younger.


#102

I’ve tried Scapa Skiren! It’s yummy


#103

Like honey.


#104

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And a diet coke or Pepsi.


#105

Is that the smoked eel thing? I’ve had dried and smoked eel (tuna in Mäori) in New Zealand and in Japanese places. Think I drank Kiwi sauv blanc with tropical fruit flavours. Good. I found a winery—Airlie— that makes a Müller Thurgau I prefer to most riesling— similar but more delicate, and only 10% alcohol.

I love gardening and cooking and charcuterie and wine. Along with writing.

Sommelier? Have you read Cork Dork by Bianca Bosker?


#106

God, I keep forgetting ever since I already gave away Martha.


#107

Tried to reply to John as well, but I could only tag one of you.

Mum roamed around Scotland and developed a taste for malt, which I’ve acquired to some degree. Not keen on the heavy peat/smoke malts (fought too many forest fires in my youth). Our cabinet presently holds Edradour (a southern highlands malt), and a bottle of Kilchoman, from the newest distillery on Islay. They did a limited Wyoming bottling for a restaurant and a friend let us taste his last bottle. On the roof of his cabin with a snowstorm bearing down.


#108

:joy:


#109

I love pizza, chipotle, Starbucks, French Macaroons, and I really limit my intake, but can’t help but love Sprite!


#110

I just had some of my dads moonshine 180 proof it burns all the way down


#111

That’s 90% alcohol, and it’s toxic. It can damage the cells in your throat and stomach. And don’t inhale while you drink.

Seriously: cut it with water and take small sips.


#112

I only had one shot and that’s all he allowed me to have


#113

And with all proper moonshine, I’d recommend the burn test for methanol. You want to avoid methanol.


#114

This is his batch he makes for special occasions


#115

That’s why the Irish buggers making potheen always spill the first drops “for the fairies.”

The toxic fractions are more volatile and come off first. That’s what will poison or blind you. (I guess the fairies are immune.)

My grandfather put together a still on his ranch and cooked a few batches, but grandma put a stop to it. She did buy him a case of Jameson’s to make up for it. I snuck a bottle into the hayloft, where it lasted for two or three years. Whiskey is an acquired taste.


#116

But it is a taste I found worth acquiring.

I used to distill my own poitìn. I started off doing it as a school project, where I persuaded my masters that it was for valid scientific reasons. It was (I got an ‘A’!), but I also learnt how to make a still.


#117

All of the best science revolves around alcohol. though I gotta say I wasn’t a massive fan of the only poitín I’ve ever tried.


#118

If everyone had to stick to one grape varietal of wine or one type of spirit for the rest of their lives what would it be?

Mine would be Riesling; from the super dry to the semi sweet all the way to dessert wine it’s just so versatile. I’ve even had a cracking oaked Australian riesling.


#119

Zinfandel/Primitivo. It pairs well with southern French and Italian dishes. I grow several sorts of tomato and it’s nice with the Mediterranean suite of spices and flavours. Also good with roast chicken.

Everyday bottles from Bogle, Cline, Ravenswood, Marietta, et al. are very palatable in the main. Upmarket vintages from Neyers, Ridge, et al. are denser and deeper, going nicely with roast lamb or venison.

Shame about the fish- I’d really miss a good Kiwi sauv blanc.


#120

Nice choice, decent versatility in a Primitivo, you could even probably stretch a Californian Zin to a steak if you found one with that slight tobacco tinge.

(Incidentally, I’m off to go buy myself a NZ Sauv in a minute)