Getting Started with Traditional Publishing

question
help
feedback

#21

This is a really good method. That’s what I’m doing right now and what I did with the last two books I revised, thank you.


#22

Ah. I didn’t think that method was common knowledge, so I passed it on just in case. I learned it in an editing course in college. Where did you pick it up?


#23

I’ve always revised and edited that way… it felt natural I thought it was common knowledge…didn’t know if had a name, though.


#24

Oh, I’ve seen a lot of people – on Wattpad and in real life – who think line editing is full editing. Even I didn’t really grasp this method until it was explained to me (I had the sense of deleting larger chunks, but not in such a streamlined way).


#25

I read about line editing but it overwhelmed me.


#26

I’ve been traditionally published by two of the big five (11 books between three contracts) so I’ll do what I can.

You never query fiction until the novel is 100% finished and extremely well polished (especially the first five pages). One of the worst things that can happen is you get someone interested (from the query) and the book itself still needs work. So, don’t send out any queries until you think you have something that is damn near perfect.

Your agent will worry about finding the publisher. You just need to find the agent. Here is a link that should help with that:

Writing Query Letters & Where to send them

I’m replacing agent with publisher here – best thing is AgentQuery and the other resources I mentioned in the link just above.

Big five publishers in that genre are: Orbit (Hachette Book Group), Ace & Del Rey (Penguin Random House), Tor (Macmillan), Harper Voyager (Harper Collins), and Saga (Simon and Schuster). The smaller publishers include: Baen, DAW, Angry Robot (although they may have been bought out), and Solaris.

Again see my link above - but I highly suggest Noah Lukeman’s free short on writing a winning query letter, and review of all posts on the Query Shark site.

A word of caution…while three books sounds like a lot, and it is. Keep in mind that Stephen King suggests you treat your first 1,000,000 words as practice and Malcolm Gladwell says it takes 10,000 hours working at something to become proficient. I doubt you have reached those levels with three books. I had 13 “trunk novels” before my 14th (which was my debut). Since then, I’ve written 18 novels (14 are released). So it takes time to find your voice and hone your skills. So, if you aren’t getting tracking on this project, you may have to spend a bit more time to get “ready for prime time.”


#27

I probably haven’t written 1,000,000 words as I’m young but I have started and reached at least chapter 1-3 on over 300 wips, completed at least 5-6 full length novels, and I’ve been writing short stories, novels, novellas, etc. for 6+ years. I’m not a professional and this will be my first time looking to truly publish but I have had a lot of practice. There’s a lot I need to learn but in writing you never stop learning, so better to try, possibly fail and learn from it than to have never tried at all.


#28

My third novel got accepted for publishing. However, I provided a revised version, after having written the fifth. I’ve also been writing non-fiction all my life. I received an R+R and submitted another revised version which got accepted. Once I got the editor’s comments I revised again, now having written seven novels, a novella and various short stories. This time, I rewrote about 60% of the story.

All this adds up. If you have an attractive story and good marketing skills, it might work, but one should really deliver a novel that’s ready for prime time rather than wonky in-betweens. I notice it myself, the latest rounds of edits lifted me well over the 2 mill mark and it makes a heck of a difference.
Give yourself time.


#29

That sounds like you are well on your way - I wish you great success…


#30

Thank you! I’m hoping to write much more, and it’s honestly not much of a start, but the way I look at it, it’s better than nothing. Best of luck with your writing as well.


#32

Hi. I really wan to know what you can do to get people reading your stories. I´m actually starting to write my second one. Do you have some advices? i don´t want to be called as a person who only wants views, i would like them to like it.


#33

There are other threads specifically for this, please find one of them. I’d yojrsjavig trouble there’s a search bar at the top where you can look up threads. Hope you’re able to get answers there :slight_smile:


#34

Are you asking about stories on Wattpad or published books?


#35

Thank you. It’s going well. And I hope the same for you.