Hello Chick lit?

#41

about 24 – :slight_smile: it’s a good group of gals. one guy lol who love romance reading.

#42

I am surprised there is only one guy, honestly I would expect more for some reason

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#43

It’s not far from the percentage of us on here. And it’s even closer if you consider it is for Romance. The stats for my ChickLit shows only 3% male.

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#44

I would believe guys enjoy romance as much as the rest of us, and I know there isn’t a lot of guy’s on wattpad in the first place, (Which is sad because I don’t believe reading and writing should be known as a “girls thing”) Hopefully the community gets a new bunch of males to make this place seem more welcoming to them or just to make it stop seeming like a rarity.

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#45

There is also the maturity factor to consider; the average age of users on Wattpad appears to be in the mid-teens. Boys that age are somewhere far away from writing, and they’ve been taught by well-meaning fathers and peers to not express feelings or show emotions. If they do write, it’s often whiz-bang, crash-thud, over-the-top action. Or the horrid amateur smut which keeps being deleted from the site. :scream:

Males do eventually mature, and some become excellent writers. :innocent:

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#46

That happens a lot in this society. Girls are taught to express their emotions more and read a lot more. I often see when the boys are aging, their peers and their parental figures in their lives direct them to sports and other more “Manly” things instead of the direction of literature. Maybe the fact that boys mature differently than girls is because of the environment they have been placed in most their lives. I feel like women grow up to be educated and smarter at a young age, (I am not calling boys stupid, just the fact that they don’t focus on more mature subjects) but I believe their immaturity and manner of feeling disconnected with writing and literature isn’t their faults. In a way, we teach them how it shouldn’t be an importance for them.

Often we tell them to shut out their emotions or use more aggressive tactics to let it out. I have even seen my brother have a fear of crying due to the fact that it isn’t accepted in this society. If you cry you are considered a baby or childish by your peers way more than if a girl were to express her emotions in similar ways.

Women are portrayed as more over emotional, but what if the true fact is that boys have been taught to shun their emotions for so long they don’t know how to connect with them in the same way. It is easier to be described as sporty than smart.

A great example, with this, is girl scouts and boy scouts. Girls learn marketing by selling cookies and other ways to express their emotions. I remember volunteering at old folks homes or singing to them. We did a lot of stuff to express our emotions or help the community or express creativity.

While in boy scouts, they are taught servivor skills, how to camp and things that seem to be known as “manly,” The only kind of camping I ever did was cabin camping and we learned how to work together and other skills that I don’t see in boy scouts as often. It’s a strange world we live in but I believe that is why there isn’t many men or boys in wattpad. Who can really say a young boy would sit down and enjoy a book without being considered a nerd or be out of place.

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#47

Maybe women are truly better with words because men have never been taught how to speak up.

#48

so far we only have 1 male writer. I’d love to see more male writers in our group who write chick lit. We only have 3 lgbt writers to. I’d like to expand that (and readers)

we really like our male writer. he and his wife are really nice in the group

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#49

actually, my friend writes romance and her book is really popular in prison. she writes first-person male POV books. they are kinda “rough” but pretty in a kind of rough cinderella kinda way.

#50

Hi all. A story I’m currently working on probably falls into chicklit. It’s female character driven, and full of humor. It’s sort of a side project that has taken on a larger life at the moment.
I also write in other genres - I don’t like to stick to one genre. I prefer variety.

#51

Hey, it’s nice to find a thread about Chicklit. I’m writing one story that could apply to that genre at the moment.

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#52

welcome to the thread

#53

Hello. Nice to see a chicklit genre.
Do you all wore only novels or sorry stories too

#54

Anyone here?

#55

Hi! I’m new here. I thought I’d pose the question what chick-lit authors are favorites around here. :slight_smile:

I liked Katy Carter Wants a Hero by Ruth Saberton, and for a chick-lit/mystery duo I love the books by Laura Levine.

#56

Hi! Anything new going on in the world of Chick Lit? There’s a flash fiction contest on the ChickLit profile if anyone feels like a nudge to create a short-short.

#57

This is a topic I’m really interested in exploring, because at school age, all these girls are writing. But when you look at the BIG names in the publishing world, there are plenty of guys: Stephen King, Patterson, Clancy, Dan Brown…not to mention all the literary writers.

What I want to know is…when did these guys start writing? And how do they “catch up” to the girls so fast? Plus they are often taken more seriously. I mean, come on. Robert James Waller with Bridged of Madison County basically wrote a women’s fiction. Nicholas Sparks basically writes romance/women’s fiction. But they aren’t labeled that way. Romance is often looked down on in the industry…so when men write it, nobody labels it romance.

#58

I’d never heard of Laura Levine. Just looked her up! Those look like really good books.

I like Sophie Kinsella, Candace Bushnell, Jennifer Crusie, Jennifer Weiner, Susan Elizabeth Philips.

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#59

I like Kinsella, too. I want to read some Weiner and Cruise, but I haven’t yet. :slightly_smiling_face:

#60

Definitely Jennifer Weiner. She has a new book out right now, but I adored In Her Shoes which was made into a movie with Cameron Diaz.

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