How do you find and mark books for older adult readers?

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#61

Can I plead dyslexia? (Not when I can’t spell it! lol)

Oh phooey - okay - all the work I post with I. C. Talbot on it was written a number of years ago by my mother, who has since passed on. I edit it, update it a little bit and publish it.

There’s a lot of it already published, but I’m going to test drive the new stuff here.

Mom had great ideas, but her work is very, very short. And she was already 50 when she started writing.


#62

I’ve only been here a few weeks and I’m already searching for Mature Writers, not necessarily ‘adult content’, so I can completely understand.


#63

While I wouldn’t say I mind teenage protagonists (I even write them, from time to time), I have seen enough teenage drama to last me forever. So, started to pick books without it a while ago.
In the meantime, the adultfic community is growing and it’s really nice to witness this development.


#64

So many different threads here, Ellen! You only have to pick the right one :wink: or start your own


#65

While there’s nothing wrong with teenage protagonists per se, Wattpad is so dominated by YA that the merest hint of it turns me off here. But even though Wattpad started with a younger demographic, as it expands, so should its age reach. Remember when Facebook was limited to college students? Now your mother is on it.


#66

:smiley: now I wonder how old your mother is… cause mine is certainly not on facebook (neither am I). And to allow her to read my stories on wattpad I had to set up her account and have to load the stories into the library for her… seems I’m ancient!


#67

In the end, I don’t care what age people are who read my work, honestly. I would like all ages to, but admittedly in my one novel up I don’t have really any of the teen buzzwords that attract. At the same time, a future work of mine has much in the way of teens, romance, and horror, and not only is a very hard R, but much of the content is geared toward adults. I lean adult, but I would never limit teens.


#68

Hehe - reminds me of my own Mom. She had a Sony Reader when they first came out.

In the Game of Life, High School is such a small blip.

For me it was - four decades ago and I hardly remember anything. Everything that came after was so much more enjoyable.


#69

Exactly my point of view… welcome, soul sister!


#70

I don’t mind a teenage protagonist as long as the setting is not a school or the genre is teen drama or romance.


#71

I don’t mind if a teenager reads my book, but seeing as it’s about an alcoholic mother with a dead bedroom, I doubt that would resonate with a teenager who has raging hormones and limited experience with alcohol. That’s why I want to target my book at adults, so appears to more of the Wattpad members who are likely to read and enjoy it.


#72

My friends have viewed my story without a Wattpad account. They just can’t comment nor vote on it.


#73

Where I’m having the problem - I think - is that I don’t have a good genre for my I. C. Talbot fiction. (The I. C. Talbot pen-name was my mother’s and I publish a good bit of her stuff after a good stiff edit.)

Women’s Fiction takes out half my intended audience. There’s no Romance for the most part. General Fiction, Adult Fiction and Mature Fiction kinda imply a lot of sex, which it doesn’t have.

Should I be looking at Literary Fiction? That’s where I ended up putting it on Amazon.

Does anybody read Literary Fiction?


#74

Having browsed the Talbot fiction on your profile, I don’t think I’d call that literary – it’s too realistic and, frankly, too feminine. You say “women’s fiction” like it’s a bad thing, but that still targets the majority of readers. But since you should target more than that, I’d sub-categorize it as Sentimental. Not exactly a cozy mystery or soft romance novel, but similar in tone.


#75

Mom called it Pulp Fiction for Women. lol But that’s not a genre here. I call a lot of it “He Done Her Wrong” fiction. Mom could be vengeful.

I do understand Sentimental. That’s a good term for her work. Is it a genre here or a tag?

‘Women’s Fiction’ isn’t a bad thing, it’s just that most men don’t read it. Most of my work is ‘Women’s Fiction’ because I break the rules of Romance.

I tried to write for Harlequin with my first novel, I was very surprised at the strict rules they had.

Thanks for taking a look and helping me with this. I looked for Literary Fiction and didn’t see that either.


#76

In a Wattpad search, #Sentimental brings up 500 stories, which I think is enough to justify using it as a hashtag. And hey, it’s just small enough that you might rank in it! (As my book briefly did in #adultfiction, with 800 results, and still does in #matureread, with 160)

Sentimental (no hashtag) brings up 9.7k results, mostly for its use in titles and descriptions.

You might also Google up “sentimental novel” to look at its wikipedia page and related genres, then search Wattpad to see if those genres are used as hashtags here.


#77

@KatJordan @Skyblacker2 I think General Fiction is the closest category we had on wattpad for this sort of fiction, although since the genres have been replaced by tags it’s not as straightforward as it used to be. In any category these days you have to wade through a few inappropriately tagged works to find what you’re looking for.


#78

Add as many relevant tags as possible. Genres, these days are no longer relevant for Wattpad, all the lists are done by tags alone.

And … we try to spread the word @adultfiction is not related to sexual content.
You might have a look at that profile over on Wattpad and, if you feel your or your mom’s stories fit, apply for being added to a reading list there.
It is an ambassador run profile with the intent to cater exactly for the audience looking for non-NA/YA books.


#79

Yes, I intend to apply for a reading list once the story is completely posted.


#80

Do I need to apply for @adultfiction - or the readling list?