How do you promote your stories?

The toughest part after writing a book is marketing your story. What are some ways that worked for you without making you look awkward?

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Honestly, I don’t market myself really. I mean I’ll post on the SYS thread for the genre of whatever book I’m actively posting, but that’s about it. However, I’ve also been here 6 years so I have an established fan base, thus I’ve gotten lazy over the years :laughing:

But I will say my being active in the clubs played a big part in me getting the active fan base that I have. It’s not a big one by any stretch, but I wouldn’t give them up for the world. Back in the day of the SYS clubs I met someone who became a friend and eventually lead to me being featured for the first time. That being featured is ultimately what got me my fan base. So I’m always a big supporter of just making friends. If they decide to read you, great. If they don’t, that’s fine too. You’ll still get a friend out of it.

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Generally if I post it on social media such as Twitter, I avoid using the most common method, which seems to be mass following other writers, and spamming their feeds wth promotions of their book currently on sale.

When I post, I tend to post it once, and then pen my work to the top of my feed.

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I post on social media, including Twitter, Minds, G+, Mastodon and whatever else there’s out there. I know I’ve had people from all four of those come check out my story, some who might not have known about it otherwise. I stay away from the mass spamming stuff though…that’s annoying and no-one likes that. I post it once. If someone is interested, they’ll check it out, maybe retweet it and that’s good enough for me. I try to track my linking through Bitly as well to get a sense for what channels work the best…although I admit, I’ve forgotten to do that lately.

For me, the social media posts are mostly to create awareness outside of Wattpad.

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I’m in the process of a career change–and marketing is on my short list. THIS is partially the reason. I don’t feel like I know how to market efficiently.

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Diaspora was good, but has had a bad alt-right problem these days. *cough I mean Religious rght.

I could be misremembering, but isn’t Diaspora decentralized? Kind of like Mastodon? My impression was that in theory, you could start your node or pod or whatever it was called, kind of like your own social network? Or am I thinking of something else.

Yep rght on the money. I go by Psypher Sarah on there, or LWFlouisa depending if 'm having a programming or writing day.

I don’t think I’m returning to Diaspora anytime soon. I think that ship sailed. I do try to keep an eye on new networks. Mastodon looks promising, Minds does as well to some extent.

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Yea I prefer Mastodon myself.

Which instances are you on? I think I’ve managed to sign myself up on at least three.

Ah! I thought I recognized that username from. Somewhere

Wandering Shop and Quitter at the moment. Experimenting with Peertube as well.

Quitter can federate with Mastodon, but isn’t Mastodon.

Is it just my perception, or is marketing different on those platforms? Of course I lucked out and found one devoted to science fiction and fantasy.

Which one is the scifi/fantasy one?

Wandering Shop. When you sign up for an instance, it asks you what kind of interests you have, and then uses that survey to find a matching instance for your taste.

I’ll have to check it out.

Easy. I don’t xD

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Same, I just let it happen, it takes time, but people will eventually come across your story if it’s good

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Everytime someone has mentioned Mastodon, I keep thinking of the band.

As for how I market… well, I’ve tried a bit. The clubs of course when users are interested in what you’re working on, the SYS threads of course, posting about something coming up on your wall, FB, Twitter, etc, etc.

There’s a number of ways to get going, but it’s super hard if you haven’t got an established userbase… I’d say that’s the hardest part of it to gain tbh

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I was in book clubs in the beginning. That helped both with getting reads and comments, but also with getting my first chapters up to a way higher standard.

I adopted the spambot lifestyle on the clubs and took a lot of time to help out people on the IYW threads, socialise in the Café and find other Fantasy nerds in the Fantasy club. It’s all about finding your peoples.

Last summer I was lucky to find an awesome community that now forms the regulars in the Accomplishment club. Not to mention, the thread is magical.

I still spend a lot of time on getting my books on reading lists. Especially the official ones run by Wattpad. I got a book of mine on a reading list on the @lgbtq channel last year and I still see people coming in from that. So find your genre channel, subgenres and niche channels and get on those reading lists!

I’ve now branched out to outside of Wattpad with Twitter, but I don’t know if I’m catching people on there or if people from Wattpad are just jumping over to Twitter. It’s still a new account.

But yeah, honestly, what has worked the best for me was just to find awesome people, have critique buddies, help out others and try and be the best person I can be. :smile:

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