How do you "see" the world? Any strange eyesight issues you never realised were abnormal?

poll
disorder
visual
eyesight

#1

Okay so I’d really like to know how (un)common these things are in regards to how eyesight works… So how do YOU see the world?

  1. Do you have “visual snow”? Think old TV snow/static but then like a constant visual overlay. (Can be visually impairing but doesn’t have to be that bad)

    7dnmp2tt87d01

  2. Do you have palinopsia? Meaning you see a “trail” of something after it has gone. Not to be confused with the light blur that stays on your retina after something bright, but like a motion blur (that’s longer than a centimetre)

  3. Halos around objects? Like little auras?
    (I can’t even find any pics that describe this :sweat_smile: but pretty sure inanimate objects don’t have “auras” :sweat_smile:

  4. Anything else you’d like to add? Like being sensitive to light, or seeing flashes, or the negative after images like those mentioned in the pic under visual snow.

  • Visual snow
  • Palinopsia
  • Object halos
  • Something else

0 voters


#2

I used to see slightly double, actually. That got fixed when I was operated for strabismus.


#3

I don’t see the floaters all the time. Mostly in the morning when I first wake up and am laying in bed. I read they’re caused by the fluid in your eyes clumping and getting hard. Happens more often in athletes, apparently. I’m not an athlete.


#4

I have a perfect sight - maybe even more than usual, if that’s abnormal :sweat_smile: And I’m extremely sensitive to light, Sun or any lamp. I can’t leave without sunglasses, even with clouded sky :sunglasses:


#5

I can see double on command, without going cross-eyed. It’s more relaxing for me to focus on one image of two instead of combining them when I have something close to my face (in the morning when I just wake-up I sometimes even have difficulty combining)


#6

I heard the same thong, or that they’re just dirt/dust particles. At any rate, not necessarily a brain abnormality :upside_down_face:


#7

I always wear a cap because bright light hurts. I prefer the dark and can actually see pretty good in the dark, to the point where I had classmates back when I was 11 all complain they couldn’t see shit when walking through the forest at night and I was able to even see the uneveness in the ground :laughing: (my love for horror already showed then, as I enjoyed their fear and might have fed it by telling a ghost story :innocent:)


#8

:joy: now I’m imagining the sound thongs might make.

…nope. now I’ve got the thong song stuck in my head. Damn it.


#9

For sake of the joke, I’ll restrain from editing that typo :joy: I’m horrible when typing on my phone, can you tell? :sweat_smile: and since thong is a word, no red line helped me spot the error before I hit Reply :laughing: oh well :heart:


#10

No. You wear that typo like a badge of honor. Own it!

Funny thing, when I typed it in my phone, it kept autocorrecting to thing, which is weird because my autocorrect normally doesn’t do anything. But it REALLY didn’t want me to use that word.


#11

:joy::joy::joy: I can see in the dark too


#12

I see something I can’t really explain, all the time, and if I really focus on it, it moves in ways that match the air current. I can correctly observe whatever the air/wind is doing around me and the types of movements it has when the temperature shifts or see the actual air pressure change when it’s about to rain. I can see where wind is or isn’t coming into a room. It looks exactly like these experiments show airflow.

I really never tell anyone because I am completely aware that I would get laughed out of the room and I don’t even believe it myself because I’ve found no scientific explanation for why and even my doctors don’t know what to say about it.


#13

Why would people laugh? That’s an amazing skill! A bit of a superpower if you ask me :blush: you should be able to prove it’s real easy enough, so if in uour experience you’ve been able to see changes in the weather coming correctly :woman_shrugging:t2: you’re for real.
Dogs can smell more than humans, even in 4D (smells have a timestamp for dogs). There are people who can smell as good too. There are animals who see magnetic fields, UV light, infrared… so you might just have some very uncommon genes :grin: any idea of other people in your family share this trait?


#14

I get floaters in my vision a lot.

I also get migraines with visual auras. So I get lots of strange blind spots in my vision when I’m having an ocular migraine.


#15

I don’t think that my family does but I suspect it’s something to do with my cmtd (charcotmarie-tooth disease) which affects all the men in my family. It mostly damages the limbs, but it also minorly-to-severely damages the eyes and makes vision difficult and so far it’s done that to all of the guys in my family tree, we all need glasses but I don’t. My vision is 20/20 every time I get a checkup. Maybe my eye is just distorted in a different way?

And I feel I would get laughed at because it’s just so bizarre I don’t know who would believe me. Like I said, I wouldn’t even believe it if someone else told me they could see the air current. I don’t know how it would work with a human eye, really. But I’m not a specialist on eyes or the morphology they’d need to have to make that possible. Thank you though! It literally never comes in handy so it’s a kind of dumb super power. :joy:


#16

That’s all very interesting! I learned something new :heart:

And I just googled a bit on birds and they actually figured out what makes them “see” magnetic fields… a special protein in the eye. Considering your genetic tree, maybe you got lucky with the lack of Y or the extra X chromosome and that resulted in a different outcome compared to your male relatives?
If a special protein can make magnetic fields visible, your “superpower” might work in a similar way :stuck_out_tongue:


#17

I see floaters (a type of visual snow), but I thought everyone can see them if they really focused :sweat_smile:


#18

My eyesight can be really weird at times…

I constantly have the little “visual snow,” I sometimes have palinopsia—it doesn’t occur all the time, just at specific moments—and then I also constantly see halos around people and objects. And if I stare at something for a little bit, like a minute or two, I tend to see double. And if an object is near my eyes, I can “see through it.” Don’t know if that’s worth mentioning? :rofl:


#19

I have zero peripheral vision because the edges of my retinas are flat.


#20

So you have tunnel vision? Does this bother you with certain activities?