How far can KDP get you?

I’m thinking of publishing via KDP down the line but I am interested to know what your experiences have been like/what your opinion on the platform is. Specifically, I would like to publish there and purchase paperback of the books to give to friends and family :slight_smile: is that possible with KDP?

Thanks for your help! :avocado:

If all you want to do is print some paperbacks for friends and family, I’d probably recommend Lulu.com instead.

If you want to publish in ebook, KDP is definitely the major player – though if youdecide NOT to participate in KDP Select (Kindle Unlimited), then you can also distribute through other online retailers as well.

If you want to publish in paperback, you can do so using the KDP tools, but I’ve heard some people prefer Ingram. You can distribute through Amazon either way.

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It’s incredibly easy to use. I love it, as I make a full-time income just from KDP (I’m exclusive with Amazon). Quality of the paperbacks is fine, I think, though there may be better options out there. For the vast majority of writers who self publish KDP overwhelmingly sells their ebooks. Paperbacks are a tiny slice of overall sales.

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That’s good to know! Have you ever gone on a site like Lulu just to print books for yourself or is that not your top priority? I really want to get sales on my stories, but I also want the feeling of holding the hard copy book in my hands.

I haven’t used Lulu. I just used Createspace and then KDP print when Createspace was folded into KDP. It’s just easier for me to keep it all in one place. Some indies say Ingram is higher quality, but I’ve never had an issue with the books made by KDP Print.

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Seen from an international perspective you are 100% right. Here in good old Germany people are old-fashioned and want books. As a result, my paperback version is selling quite well (that will stop as soon as the first wave of friends and colleagues has been and gone). But the e-book market is definitely a lot less important here.

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I also found that friends and family generally want paperbacks. But those get exhausted pretty quick.

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I’m on KDP. They have a good program called Kindle Create. The learning curve wasn’t too hard, but it beats having to format your own work, and I don’t have to do it myself off Word. My 3rd book I just released I used Kindle Create for paperback and loved that I didn’t have to mess with the formatting.
Doing formatting for paperback is so time consuming and hair pulling. I’m thankful that Kindle Create has made it possible to now do paperback formatting and not just ebooks.

I will be trying out D2D Draft 2 Digital for my standalone chapter book i have coming out this year, because I want to see how well it does going wide.

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Hardcopy is extremely expensive. I’ve priced it and I would have to buy in bulk to keep the cost down. Paperback on the other hand, KDP does on demand.

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Like you, I sell a good portion of my paperbacks to friends and family signed copies. As well as in my reader group. But, straight from amazon ebooks are way more popular.

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That is what I was wondering; does publishing with KDP and then purchasing on-demand paperback give you the same “satisfaction” or “bang for your buck” as with other sites that may make you format everything yourself and charge you extra for a more pristine-looking product?

I’ve only done KDP so I have no idea. KDP on demand has been fine. Yes, there has been mistakes, but Amazon is good about returning flawed books that come in.

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I believe it not only depends on the country, but also the genre. For example: YA, paper books. Romance, ebooks.

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