HOW LONG!?!? 🤯


#1

This isn’t a real question I suppose. The question is “How long can an agent make you wait on a response?” The answer, however, is… as long as they want. So as we wait, anyone want to vent on the query process? I know waiting is part of the game but as i head towards my 8th month of waiting on a particular query its getting to me again hehe.

Let me ask a real question to start this off. How many queries have you been sending out at once? At what point do you send out a new batch? So come all those who are querying ( or endeavor to query soon). Lets support one another in this strange limbo :sweat_smile:


#2

As long as they want - I’m still waiting for a response to a full an agent requested in 2012! :rofl:

When I was querying I sent an initial batch of 10 and then would send a new query for every reject that came in or when I closed one with no response. So I had 10 active at any one time. Some people do it in lots of 5.


#3

How long did you wait for a “close”? And lol on the full. How many follow ups did you try before giving it up? Just wondering. I do think its pretty horrible for agents to request fulls and then not even bother with a form rejection.


#4

I know you know my story, but it’s worth it to repeat for those wandering past. Submitted Crimson Queen in February 2016 to arguably the top fantasy agency, got a partial (50 pages) request July 2016, got full request January 2017 . . . almost a full year to just go from initial query to full request.

EDIT: and by that time I’d already self-published, and the book has gone on to sell upwards of 35k copies.

And I don’t understand how agencies can continue to work like this in the modern world.


#5

Thats legit INSANE. I didnt remember that it was nearly a whole year. But i did rember the happy ending hehehe.

I know i shouldnt stress this much over this query. Its just that she came back after 5 months ( she asked for the full outright) and said she wanted to keep reading. The way she wrote the message ending with “more tk from me…” I somehow had hope I might hear soon. Its only been 2.5 months since so i guess… i just need to stop being like this hehe. Its just hard somtimes. Im frustrated that im getting some fulls and so many…no response. Its hard to know if somthing is wrong with what im sending? Or if its just personal preference. I do wish for the days when people actually sent rejections :laughing:


#6

Also I agree. I think the level of power agents have vs authors in this is pretty nuts. I mean just common curtesy is only required on one side it seems and thats hard to swallow. Still i do get it from their pov. Most agents cant make this their main job. They have a lot to juggle. But a rejection with a click? I feel like thats not too much to ask? Im not an agent though lol. I know its silly, and maybe they never see it? But i thank agents for rejections ( form or not) cause i really DO appreciate the closure


#7

This is a BIG reason why I abandoned querying very early (along with that I decided that self-publishing was a better option currently)

I felt like I was groveling to give someone the chance to make money from me and my work, which I found really screwy.


#8

I get that. Im not groveling though to my mind. Im just putting it out there. This stress is kinda self imposed and I know it. I want the traditional thing. I know what im in for. I dont have the confidence to move into self tbh. And my book IS kinda niche. I want professional help in that and I think without an agent/ traditional? I dont think i can do this. I would try small press next


#9

On queries I would close them out after 3 months if there was no reply. On the full, I nudged that agent three times over a period of eighteen months (every 6 months) and never got a response. While I appreciate agents are swamped with hundreds of queries every month and have no issue them not responding to rejected queries, but I do think its rude to not respond to fulls.

When I submitted to the Strange Chemistry open call (they were the YA imprint of AngryRobot) it took 18 months to work through from submitting, to full request, to having the MS put before the acquisitions committee.


#10

Sounds reasonable. And yeah. No response after full is crappy. Havent had that yet though i did get a form reject after 6 months of waiting with a 50 page request that turned full. I wish she could have offered SOMTHING since she requested after the first 50 but i guess it is what it is


#11

All my full requests except 2 turned into rejects. It still hurts… sob


#12

Wait… 2 were offered rep??


#13

I once had an agent email me after five years to tell me she found my MS and that it somehow got misplaced. Then she told me she was a no anyway. While I’m not sure why she bothered, I did have a good chuckle.


#14

Wow… now that has to be a record on late response hehe. I got a rejection after 8 months. I didnt really understand why respond at that point but… eh at least it was closure hehe. I still thanked her for it


#15

What ended up happening with that book?


#16

I had a offer on one manuscript from Strange Chemistry just before they were shut down :slightly_frowning_face: the other was an offer from the publisher I signed with. Still couldn’t get an agent even with contracts in hand, so make of that what you will.


#17

Got it. I still havnt tried any pubs. Had an editor who seemed pretty interested in the idea in pitch contests though? idk its a diff tactic so i havnt gone there yet. And meh. You made your own successful writing career path so their loss!


#18

I had no choice since no one else wanted me! :joy:

You’ve got to find the path that suits you. I started querying agents, then dropped to publishers taking unsolicited submissions, self publish was after that. And I still want an agent/trad deal for my YA projects, I just can’t move them on my own. While I have sold subsidiary rights myself, I wonder what else I could do if I had an agent on my team. If I had the right project I would definitely hit the query trenches again.


#20

I sent out one at a time for a total of 3. That’s when I realized traditional publishing was not for me. I don’t know how anyone can put up with the traditional publishing industry.


#21

It was picked up by another publisher. This particular agent had originally asked for an R&R which I had done and she lost/forgot/misplaced for 5 years. I suppose i should have followed up with her, but when it got picked up a year or so later, I assumed she’d passed on it.