HOW LONG!?!? 🤯


#42

You know what - that gives me hope. My nephew refuses point blank to read anything. “There’s films. No point in reading.”
I feel like screaming.
In films, you only see what the director wants you to see. In books, you’re the director (well, to a degree).
Your sons are great


#43

Who needs a credit card to shop at Amazon? I buy things there all the time and I don’t have one. You just need an ATM card, and every kid in America has one of those. Teens buy plenty of things on Amazon, like video games and streaming movies. They just don’t like buying books, but they could if they wanted to.


#44

Do your nephew’s parents read? It’s very much a learned behaviour. My kids were born surrounded by books and since we limit screen time, they have devoured books for years. Every time I hear “boys don’t read” I like to post screen shots of the pile of books next to my son’s bed! lol

@AkjeMajdanek you might not need a credit card to shop Amazon if you live in America, but you do need one to buy ebooks online if you live anywhere else in the world :slight_smile:


#45

My sister like me is a voracius reader. She and my mum spend lots of time reading to the kids. We bought them books, we read together. Once they were 9 ten years old that was it. It’s such a shame. Boys do read. Just this one does not.


#46

Maybe he hasn’t found the right series? I know with my youngest when he was around that age it took a lot of work to find a book that captured his imagination and then he would power read through an entire series and re-read the ones he enjoyed. So many books have a romance subplot now it can take some effort to find the boy-centric books they want at that age, or even ones with a male MC as opposed to a girl in the lead.


#47

How old is he? I LOVED the vampire’s assistant cirque de freak series and that was a very male targeted one i feel like young teen boys could get into


#48

My son LOVES that series! He devoured it when he was about 9 and we have the movie and all the paperbacks, which are really cool as when you put them together there is a picture that runs over the spines and they spell out Cirque de Freak.


#49

No way! I didnt know that. Way back when i was looking for a ya to eat. I was thinking cirque de freak or percy jackson. I think i chose roght. It was actually a really doff vampire take and i was struck by the way they masterfully made it male reader friendly. I always like action and am not a huge romance person so it worked great for me. I was hooked quick and devoured them all. The movie they made was dissapointing though hehe. At least i thought so


#50

He’s beyond that now, I’m afraid. He’s sixteen and a hardcore gamer. Well, it sounds worse than it is, he’s a lovely young man. But books - no way. And ne notices the effects of not reading. He really has trouble with maths because of the texts…


#51

It can change! My brother loved to read when he was little - then he hit the moody and broody teenage stage where he wouldn’t read anything and only play video games and watch TV. When he got out of puberty and hit the early 20’s, he got back into it again. So yours might just need to get through that phase and then get back into books again :smile:


#52

Not going to query, and probs not welcome here, but I’m an avid teen reader who prefers paper as well. I prefer paper as I can hold it, gawk at the cover, abuse the poor thing as much as I want by putting it on the table on the right page instead of using a bookmark. I like how I can see my personal bookshelf getting more and more full with all the different colors, how anyone who comes into my room can see I’m deeply into fantasy and science fiction. And of course that paper books are truly mine. I own them, I see them. Mine. No touchy.

On that rather egotistical note, I’m going back into hiding.


#53

You are absolutely welcome here!

Info like that is very helpful for us. If we understand our potential readers, we are better able to reach them and give them what they want.


#54

If you want some more info, here’s some more two cents :stuck_out_tongue: I, as a reader, want more YA that doesn’t revolve around romance. I’m not interested in romance in general and am kind of tired that romance contaminates almost every single book you can find. Stories can be great without having the two MC’s hook up.


#55

I think that’s one reason electronic looked exponential for a while, then growth slowed, and is still slowing, long before reaching 50%. It isn’t only that people like the tactile aspect of books (I read both, but I really do like a well-made paper book best). They gradually became suspicious of vendor lock-in, DRM, and the whole idea of paying a new book price for something you’re only renting.

I’ve had an expensive Nook book vanish forever because of B&N’s problems. Amazon has famously pulled books back that people have bought; decided they didn’t want them read any more.

Imagine the potential for an authoritarian political regime deciding to revoke all the already-purchased books it didn’t like. Think it can’t happen? We’ve had the spectacle of organizations in Canada and elsewhere trying to salvage previously public US scientific data and papers while they are being taken down and buried because they disagreed with the current president’s politics.

No really strong reason that couldn’t happen to ebooks. Paper books pose a bigger problem - they have to be hunted down one by one and burned :slight_smile:


#56

Now that is shady.


#57

The right answer to that is to pre-emptively mirror anything that gets published on any government website, on the assumption that sooner or later, some Idiot Politician™ will find its presence inconvenient. For the paranoid, the mirror should be in a different country, so that the Idiot Politician™ can’t just order the Corrupt Police™ to tell the Craven ISP™ to take it down.

Of course, then the Idiot Politician™ will claim that the mirror isn’t an accurate copy of what the government originally said, or is a complete fabrication, but you have that problem with paper records too.


#58

It TOTALLY is!! Only…each industry professional is convinced they’re God, they’re the only one who’s right…and look how many of them passed on Harry Potter. LOL!!

I heard that a lot from people who submitted stories to agents that I thought were wonderful and worthwhile stories. “Not different enough.” “The writing isn’t artistic enough.”

Yet look at the stories that get thousands of reads on here. Clearly the reading public is not thinking like an agent or editor.

I see the same thing with movie reviews. Film critics have seen absolutely everything, and I think it affects the way they see such that they don’t experience movies like the average moviegoer anymore. Films that are popular get trashed by the critics, and the critical darlings are the ones nobody goes to see.

Thank god we have self-publishing. Now we can just bypass the gatekeepers and readers can find what they like.


#59

Good question!! I used to think it was the be-all and the end-all, because of people’s general opinion that if some big New York corporation bought YOUR book, it was the stamp of quality. And if you want to be in the running for major awards, you have to be traditionally published.

But, man. When I looked at the numbers, and HOW HARD it is for a traditionally published author to make ANY money AT ALL…

…and then I experienced the process firsthand with my husband’s last book, I started to think: “Nahhh.”

It’s kind of like trying to mate elephants. It involves a lot of screaming and noise, it occurs at a very high level, and it takes a year to produce results. (Make that, MANY years.) If you’re young and you’ve got the time, and you or your publisher think you’ve got that one-in-a-million book that’s going to touch the public nerve so deeply that you’re destined to sell thousands of copies right out of the gate, maybe it is worth it.

That’s not me and I already know that.


#60

It’s just so great to see so many kids who WANT to read.


#61

You might consider traditional publication through a small press. It will have the stamp of quality that self-publication lacks, but is open to unagented books that are more midlist than bestseller. A happy medium, I think.