Literature authors that inspire you/get in your head

#22

Yea not sure what you’d call a Gothic fiction, where the author isn’t absolutely attached to their Southern roots. (Speaking from experience.)

But I’ve heard a lot of good things about Southern Gothic. Southern can have a surprising amount of variations, depending on the state.

#23

The way I understand it, Gothic fiction is based on dark fiction during the Romantic Age. Things like Wuthering Heights, Frankenstein and anything by Edgar Allen Poe. It deals with dark, powerful emotions, like being scared or out-of-control.

Note, the Romantic Period is not the genre romance. It’s a literary and cultural movement.

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#24

Yea I noted the fact, and the hilarious puns the way word is used sets up.

I’m kind of wanting to be romantic in both senses.

#25

Cool. I’m used to there being some real young people here who may not know. so I like to qualify, As I learned in comp class, write to your audience. So when in doubt, I take a second to flesh-out the background to avoid misunderstandings.

Now, I’m back to work. I’ll be stuck here until 7 easily tonight.

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#26

I only know of Romance (in the original sense). I only really know, as … 1800s is kind of my thing aside from Near Future.

I hope work is good, don’t wear yourself out to much.:confused: (I’m a software dev in Creative Commons.)

#27

I’m the engineering manager for a small mid-sized manufacturing concern in the Rust Belt. I usually work a split between both shifts so I can coordinate the industrial engineers and shipping & receiving managers from both first and second shifts. Or plot workarounds to accommodate down machines or material shortages or whatnot.

So it sounds bad, until you realize my work day is usually 10 to 7 or 12 to 9.

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#28

Hey at least a non dentist, there isn’t any “Dentists have more magazines than sadist” jokes.^ ^

That statement sounded better in my head.

That was probably the one American TV show that did manage to get into my head: Seinfeld. And for what reason I’ve never been entirely sure.

I like Slice Of Life, but I don’t like comedies terribly much. (Possibly ironically, for those who know my seemingly infinite interest in puns.:P)

Usually I prefer Japanese-Horror that blends with HFN romance.

#29

LOL @ dentists.

For your enjoyment, check out The Dentist Song: https://youtu.be/bOtMizMQ6oM

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#30

Very nice, that improved my mood greatly after listening to Lilium.

#31

Oh Murakami gets into my head for entirely different reasons from say David Foster Wallace.

As strange as it sounds, I find Murakami weirdly more relocatable at times. It’s not something I’d be very good at verbalizing why, it’s just kind … well true.

#32

Love Murakami. I’m reading horror right now and will through Halloween (Joe Hill Heart Shaped Box and Paul Trembley The Disappearance at Devils Rock). Something I do every year, going back to my middle and high school love of all things Stephen King.

But I just picked up Colorless Tsukuru and plan to read it after I’m done horror geeking.

And DFW was genius. Infinite Jest is one of the great books of the 21st century in English thus far. I’d say the greatest, but George Saunders’s Lincoln in the Bardo edged it out for me.

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#33

What are you thoughts on Thomas Hardy or Emile Zola? In both cases I’ve heard they’re extraordinarily dry by today’s standards. But then there are certain books I wonder, if today’s standards have really changed all that much.

Going to read Therese Requin for real this time, and not skipping to the ending. I’ve never found endings very satisfying though, even in great books. Often I find myself liking the story despite that fact. But eh, I don’t know about this one…

Modern LitFic and Classic LitFic seem to have a bit of a different feel.

I thought Broom Of The System was a laugh riot and plan to continue in, when not in “Revision Hell” for my Vampire Western Romance.

#34

You and George R. R. Martin. When he comments on his admiration for Tolkien, it’s always worth listening/reading about.

#35

Haven’t read Pynchon yet. Where would be a good start? Was the film of Inherent Vice a decent adaptation?

#36

Games of Thrones is very hard for me to read. It is very well-written, but the shows are easier to watch. I can fast-forward the gory scenes. Lol.

His writing is amazing.

#37

I’ve heard good things about Evonovich, does she write series or can you pick a random book and get into it?

#38

Both. Her Stefanie Plum books are a series with the book order in the title (eg. Two for the Dough is book 2). She explains the characters more in book one and after briefly explains each one. I can’t find a copy of the first one cheap so i started at two and read nine also. You can just pick it up and you’ll catch up. She’s a very good writer. The set is in NJ so it’s hard for me being a small town Californian, but I enjoy her humor and crazy characters. Another one to look at on Kindle who is similar is Elise Sax. Her Matchmaker series are hilarious. Lol I was sad when I read them all. They’re like $4.99

#39

ok cool ill definately check it out!

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#40

same here, I wish I could get into the books!

#41

I enjoyed Hardy when I read him in high school, especially Mayor of Casterbridge. I also read _ Tess of the d’Urbervilles_, which I thought really good. From what I remember, he was a nice bridge between the Romantic and Modern. Sort of like Yeats

And I’ve honestly not read any Zola.

Yes, Modern has a different feel than Romantic fiction. As does Post-Modern stuff. I have no idea what they’ll end up calling today’s era a long time from now, but we today have a renewed sense of plot and character. Our writers tend to be less pretentious than Modernists of Postmodernists, and more willing to just tell a good yarn with characters we’ll follow.

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