offended when people don't want to read LGBT+?

question

#41

Yeah, I’ve been thinking about my audience and how my story will be perceived. My story The Straddlers deals with pretty much everything from anorexia to psychosis to suicide and depression, therapy and purpose, family and abuse, etc. It’s sort of a hit or miss, I feel. A lot of my stories are. Either it’s not for you and you don’t really like it or it touches you on a personal level and you really appreciate it


#42

^^

I absolutely agree with that
And with the rest of your reply. thank you


#43

I think there’s so many different reasons for someone not to want to read LGBT+ stories, from not liking the representation to being homophobic to not feeling qualified to critique it or wanting to stay out of politics to being tired of LGBT focus to not liking the writing to assuming it has “weird” romance etc. There’s so many possible explanations that assuming that the person is homophobic may not be correct. I think we should give them the benefit of the doubt and talk with them respectfully without leaping to conclusions. I don’t specifically read LGBT+ because I don’t want it to be the main focus, just an element. I like stuff with LGBT+ content where it’s part of the character, not the defining feature. But if I just said “I don’t read LGBT+” people would think I’m homophobic because I didn’t explain myself. We just need to be really careful with the conclusions we make.


#44

So if the issue here isn’t the desire to force others to read what they don’t want to read, what is the issue? Is the uncontested opinion of “I do not want to read LGBT” catering to an unquestioned acceptance of anti-LGBT attitudes? I think the answer to that is… sometimes. Without further information, we cannot know, but requiring further information to be presented to prove a lack of homophobic and transphobic attitudes can be invasive.


#45

Sure, I agree with all that you said.


#46

I agree. The problem is most people say I don’t read LGBT and leave it at that. It’s hard to know what they mean by that, and I personally don’t want to go through the trouble of asking them about it b/c

  1. it’s time consuming
  2. they could be homophobic and i don’t want to deal with that

So I guess all we can ask is that people specify what they say


#47

Totally see what your saying. Being open minded is so important.

Thing is, and I’ll specify this is only my belief I’m not talking on behalf of all of Wattpad here, if you specify LGBT in the title it’s pretty safe to assume that the focal point will be sexuality.

Why? Because being Gay, Lesbian, Bi etc is as much an identification of sexuality as being straight is. If someone put “Straight” in the title what would you assume? It’s an action comedy filled with nuanced references and clever puns, or it’s a story about straight romance?

If it’s the former, no need to put a heads-up label on it, right? Because then you’re misrepresenting your own story. If it’s the latter, fair enough to preface it.

If you preface a story that only has a few elements in it like: the main character is a gay detective. He’s had to work much harder than anyone else because of that blah blah blah and the rest of the story is focused on how he solves cases with less resources and less help than anyone else, then I would suggest not putting LGBT in the title or prefacing it. Theres no need. If the story isn’t sexually driven, why the hang up on sexuality?


#48

Very true, I think this captures the core of this problem


#49

Brooklyn 99 lol


#50

I think the issue is that the phrase “I don’t want to read LGBT” sounds homophobic to some, but asking them about it runs the risk of them being homophobic and having to engage in a conversation with someone with a radically different belief than you. idk, it’s really complicated and it differs slightly with each person


#51

Overall I agree with this, but it’s worthwhile to point out that being LGBT is more than just referring to a sexuality — it is an identity as well, and the desire to see our identities represented has borne the LGBT category more than any romantic slant.


#52


#53

^^ this


#54

hi ambassador


#55

As a person who deals with fussing out unacceptable content I have to read all kinds of stuff, from pure smut to stupid drivel. So much of the stuff that is tagged as BXB or MXM or GXG is either pure smut or borderline. I can totally see where someone who is scanning stories would assume that LGBT stories include sex. That’s the kind of thing where I see the horrific abuse, too. What’s sad is that that stuff isn’t written by LGBT most of the time.


#56

When do we owe others the disclosure of our intentions and beliefs? This is dictated by culture more than by personal preference, and right now, Wattpad’s culture is one that allows “No LGBT” as an acceptable standalone statement (despite it being against the written guidelines).


#57

Hmm that’s a complicated one for me!

See, for me, being straight has nothing to do with my identity- it’s my tenacity, my ambition that defines who I am. Not once in my life have I considered my gender to define me whatsoever- I’ve always been too focused on becoming a famous person.

But I guess that differs from person to person and hearing you establish that, in your opinion, it’s an identity has opened my eyes as to why people get so upset.

Thanks for the insight :slight_smile:


#58

This is a good question. I know of at least one person that is legitimately ‘triggered’ by male / male content, due to life experiences. Should they be expected to 1)risk exposing themselves to such content or 2)be expected to have to tell a stranger things they can’t tell their parents?


#59

my book, lol.

On a serious note, it’s sad that people assume LGBT+ works are smut or whatever

Yeah, this is especially disturbing.


#60

Oh no. Believe me your story is not in that category. In fact, it sounds like it might be fun.

When I say drivel, I mean stuff that is either incoherent or just plain silly - and weird smut like Shrek X Hitler or Dora the Explorer X Trump.