POV (One or One Hundred?)

I have two questions:

  1. How many POVs do you prefer to write in?
    1.1. If you write in multiple, how do you balance it, and how do you keep each voice unique?
    1.2. Do you think it’s necessary to state POVs? Additionally, do you think third person really requires the author to state “XX POV”?
    1.3. Is it possible to create indents on these posts? :sob:

  2. What is the maximum POVs you like to read?

  • One POV
  • Two POVs
  • Three POVs
  • Four plus POVs

0 voters

@Calmwolf this is me, trying to be educative and social, but failing xD

Okay! I like to write in as many POV as is needed in the book! I put down two only because in my current book I use two. I think you should have some way of identifying a pov change. Ive seen names a chapter headers, font changes, chapter names change (Ex. Chapter 1, chapter II). I think you can code an indent?

Ill see what i can find for you, lol

I prefer 1 POV but if its done well and right, then i dont mind multiple

1 Like

I usually try to stick to one because it’s easier for me. But sometimes a story just needs more than one. I generally try to do no more than 3. As for how to balance…I don’t. I just let them come when they feel right.

And if the POV is done right (meaning each is distinct) then no, theres no reason to announce it. First person I could see needing it but I have my own bias against multi POV in the first. I hate it lol

2 Likes

@Calmwolf I prefer one POV too, and I’ll only really read 2 or more if the writing and changes are elegant and smooth.

and xD thanks.

@Prisim yeah, same. I usually write in one POV and haven’t ventured otherwise until recently. I’ve tried, but it didn’t ever feel natural and the character felt fake. And then one day, I just felt, I can _write _ in Nolan’s POV and I did and it came out so great.

And yes, :100: I agree, in third person, if it’s done right, there’s no need for POV changes [that’s usually my tell tale sign as to whether someone who kinda knows what they’re doing is writing the story, or someone who doesn’t]

2 Likes

Some teens know what they’re doing. Those two aren’t mutually exclusive.

1 Like

Yup, I know xD sorry, my post was a bit narrow. A good few teens do know what they’re doing, but a good few also don’t, if you know what I mean?

With some stories the POV just click. With others they don’t. So I find if i come to a POV in a story I struggle with then I ask myself does the book really need that POV? Not every book needs it to get the story told.

1 Like

Told ya we could get this thread up and running!!!

1 Like

The same can be said for adults, too, or anyone really. Age doesn’t predict writing proficiency.

3 Likes

@Lumi @xkaydotx Lol, I agree, age do and doesn’t effect writing. Its complicated

1 Like

I’ve been a serious writer since 16.

Non-serious since 11.

I admit I wrote a lot of crap but I did produce some good stuff in my teen years.

2 Likes

Totally agree!

1 Like

I agree! Again, sorry about the generalisation. Up until maybe I was 16-17, my writing was absolute cringeworthy.

1 Like

Non serious since I was 5-6
Serious, we’ll I wrote my first WP book when I was 11? 12?
But now is the most serious I’ve even been :slight_smile:

1 Like

I still am cringe worth :joy: :joy:

1 Like

I also still occasionally write crap.

So… it’s definitely not an age thing.

Age just raises the probability that someone has writing experience.

But that probability is never equal to 100%

3 Likes

Lol, Ive been doing pretty well! And I’ll have to take a look at your books (everyone here) so I can deny everything you guys say :slight_smile:

1 Like

Totally agree!

1 Like

Lol. Same. But that’s because I practiced writing more at age 15/16 with CYOA’s.

2 Likes