Sexual content – how much is too much?

writing
question
discussion
#41

Or perhaps an option to mark topics that can/will include more mature language, so that people can stay clear.
I’m wondering if it’s the word penis or pubic hair that served as the tricker… :thinking:

#42

Im here so no need to head there and I can answer the question. The threads are intended to be PG-13. thats part of the rules here. Explicit descriptions of genitals goes beyond that to my mind and thus the sample crosses a line. Does that answer?

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#43

Yes; thank you! I’ll edit my question in the other thread.

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#44

In general the clubs are open. While users can chose what sorts of books they open on wattpad, the clubs are more in your face. thats why we keep the content appropriate for all audiences here

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#45

There were no descriptions of genitals? :thinking:
Edit: That is, I used the word penis, but I didn’t describe it…

#46

One other thing to keep in mind is that with teen fiction, you’re depicting characters who are minors. This is probably more of an issue for visual media and published novels, but there’s still something to be said of “showing” underaged bodies/sex between people under the age of legal consent. Even though minors have sex in real life, there is some question as to what social responsibility you bear when depicting this—although how much this matters is obviously open to interpretation. Age of consent laws also vary between countries, so that may be something to be aware of when your audience is global.

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#47

You did though… the penis pressing taught against the boxer shorts and the pubic hair is where it crossed the line for me. BUt just to give you my own feedback as an adult reader? I personally dont need such detail. It makes it less sexy for me to read tbh. thats just my preference though. I know others are diff

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#48

I mean i didnt even look at the age here. I was just going by the content and whether or not i thought it became to explicit for pg13. The details did to my mind in this case

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#49

I, funny enough, did research this when I started writing, and the legal age of consent in New York - where my story takes place - is 17, which my characters are.
And the fact that they are just 17 is one of the reasons why I mention that that was also one of the factors I considered when writing sexual content. :blush:

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#50

Okay. I was thinking more in the lines of volume/shape/length what-have-you. :grin: Because that kind of description is what I would consider mature. To each their own.

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#51

Have you considered categorizing your story as “new adult” rather than “young adult?” I didn’t get a chance to see your sample, but it sounds like this sort of content would have more of an NC-17/new adult age rating.

Edit: I see you’ve actually categorized it as “teen fiction,” which in my mind is the same as young adult contemporary, but you may have a different perspective.

#52

But most kids read “up” meaning that 17 year olds will be reading stories about college or 20-somethings.

Thirteen year olds will be the ones reading about the 17 year old.

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#53

Yep, which is why the young adult/new adult distinction matters—different expectations due to different target age of readers.

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#54

Isn’t new adult more college related than high school related? I think of it as new adult as characters that are more independent and can legally drink in bars. Whereas young adult is that age just below that (high school). So the only genre I can select on Wattpad that fits, is teen fiction. They don’t offer new adult/NC-17.

#55

You’re right; it is.

#56

New Adult isn’t just about the age of the characters but also about the more mature themes. If it deals with death in a certain manner (often a more realistic manner), drugs use, etc. then it’s New Adult.

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#57

To quote;

New adult literature touches upon many themes and issues to reach the readership that falls in between the categories of young adult and adult fiction.

Many themes covered in young adult fiction such as identity, sexuality, depression, suicide, drug abuse, alcohol abuse, familial struggles, bullying are also covered in new adult fiction, but the various issues that are dealt with in the category hold it separate. Some common examples of issues include first jobs, starting college, wedding engagements and marriage, starting new families, friendships post-high school, military enlistment, financial independence, living away from home for the first time, empowerment, loss of innocence, and fear of failure.

This category focuses heavily on life after an individual has become of legal age, and how one deals with the new beginnings of adulthood. Commonly, these themes and issues have been seen taking place post-high school in popular new adult fiction titles, but there are exceptions.

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#58

But those themes also do tend to align with whether the main characters are college or high school age, so it’s not a bad marker. ¯\(ツ)
Since New Adult is such a new genre, idk if that line is very well defined.

#59

I think they tend to refer to it more as ‘legal age’ as - you’re right - the line isn’t well defined yet as it’s still a relatively new niche group of stories. As legal age varies from country to country, so too does the age of the protagonist. In England that would be from age 16 up, but in some countries it might be age 21.

#60

Still, that genre doesn’t exist on Wattpad.

35

The only genre-choice you can’t see here is werewolf.