The Wattpad Struggle


#41

#storyofmylife


#42

The best way of being social on wattpad is by commenting on the books you read. It’s really valuable to writers when you leave feedback. And many writers might look at your books in return. It’s the most rewarding way to get better at writing as well as attracting more readers. I know that many readers want to read quietly and mot comment but as a writer i absolutely love getting comments from readers, i love the connection between me and my readers and Ilove helping other writers by leaving feedback. I’ve seen lots of readers not knowing what to say but think of the sort of feedback you would like on your story, and leave that sort of comment on a book you are reading. Pick out a couple of things in every chapter that you like (ut can be a metaphor, a description, a sentence, a bit of dialogue, an action scene etc) and let the writer know you like it. You can also choose something you think could be improved and let the writer know why or how. If any part confuses you, it’s good to say so as that can really help a writer edit. I often leave comments about character development, dialogye, descriptions. Some writers will ask specific questions at the end of each chapter in an author note, or at the very end of the book - it’s really nice to answer a few of them to help the writer out. If that still seems too daunting and you don’t want to critique or feel too unsure about upsetting the writer, even really small comments are great to hear. Responses like “love this!!” or “noooo you can’t do that” or “omg what a cliffhangar” help writers see how readers are feeling as they read. You can literally type what’s in your head as you read. Like “i can’t believe he just did that” for example. It’s simple but really lovely to read stuff like that.


#43

Thanks for the advice, it sounds like a good plan and I’ll keep it in mind when I’m reading. Unfortunately I don’t actually read much here, but that’s something else I can do better too :stuck_out_tongue:


#44

I was a giant bag of anxiety wheni first joined Wattpad and started getting into the clubs. Fortunately I found an awesome core of folks that I’m still internet friends with to this day.
You’ll find, except for a select few, Wattpad is a very open and friendly platform. The ambassadors are awesome too.


#45

I’ve been on Wattpad since 2014, and all I’ve done is read/watch! I’ve recently begun to write more, as I’ve gotten older and have realized writing is something I love. Despite the fact that I’ve been a member for almost four years, I’ve just discovered the community and overall social aspect. I guess what I’m trying to say is you are definitely not alone!


#46

I think it is difficult, even for social people, to find the right balance between working on your own projects and making friends with other writers by helping them with theirs. I left the Scribophile site because their system of critiquing, where you had to do an inline crit of 3 or 4 other people’s work before being allowed one upload of your own, meant I was spending all my time critting other authors and getting none of my own work done.

The problem on Wattpad is exactly the opposite. You can upload as much as you like and crit other people as much as you like, but that doesn’t mean they’re going to return the favour. Because there’s no requirement even for 1:1 crit swaps even the best writers can struggle to get read or build up a following.


#47

What you described for inline crust sounds like why I haven’t joined any book clubs here yet :stuck_out_tongue: some of them use that same rule and I honestly don’t feel like I even have that much feedback in me for every chapter. I only started writing last year and don’t feel like I know enough about it to be judging other peoples work


#48

I am


#49

I suppose I am, because I feel buried and out of the loop? I’m pretty new, and I’ve been resisting the urge to join for really long. Now I feel kind of overwhelmed, and I can’t seem to properly interact at all.


#50

Writing inline crits is a real challenge when you can’t find anything you would change, esp if you’re working to the rules they have on Scribophile where you only earn upload points once your crit goes over a certain word limit.

I’ve written entire stories shorter than some of the critiques I did on Scribophile. :roll_eyes: It just wasn’t a productive use of my time.

I plan to join the Clumsy Critiques Book Club when I’m a bit further in to my NaNo project. Their rules are a more relaxed. It’s run by @Sara91Helal and the guidebook is on her WP profile.


#51

Well, thanks to your post here I’ve followed you and added your story to my reading list. I love pirate fantasy!


#52

Oho! Thank you! Good luck on nanowrimo!


#53

I may check that out then, relaxed rules sounds good


#54

Sorry to read that you’re having such trouble with interacting on the platform, @Puondcake93 . Still, there’s nothing wrong with you just reading and watching. However, since you do enjoy reading Wattpad stories, a good way, then, to help you to “get out of your shell” and “interact,” is by simply commenting on story chapters. Doing so could help you to, slowly, feel more comfortable with interacting. If, at first, “commenting” is too much for you, start out with either just “voting” on chapters, or, at the very least, adding books that you’ve read to, say, a “Recommended” book list that you create on your Wattpad page. By doing any one of those things, you can help yourself, over time, to feel more comfortable about interacting–since each of those things can bring others “to you,” by way of either them thanking you for a chapter vote, or an add of their book to your “Recommended” list,


#55

I think your best bet is to not think so much about “how to comment,” @RileyKifer , or to worry that you didn’t comment correctly. To triumph over that “fear,” just tell yourself that whenever, or whatever you comment (e.g., “Thanks,” or “Thank you”) is at the right time and said the right way. Try not to second guess yourself. :slight_smile:


#56

Those are good points, @Samsortawrites !


#57

Start small. Give opinions on titles, names, that sort of things, until you get comfortable with chatting. You don’t have to do in-depth controversial conversations, like the one I’m in on evolution. It’s like 20 versus one, and I’m the one, lol. Talk about writing, ask questions about grammar rules, or writing techniques, those are safe. I started one thread to ask about S’s, using an apostrophe after a name ending in s.


#58

I joined Scribophile, God knows why but I did. Curiosity really. Very nice folks and all that, but when some one did a critique on my work ripping it to bits based on an online analysis machine , I was like…I’m not sure this is for me.


#59

Ugh. That’s actually against Scribophile’s ToC’s. Everyone i knew on there actually put real effort in to their critiques, but that was a big part of the problem. When you’re a slow writer like me, that’s time you can’t afford to waste.


#60

I was like… how dare you? I don’t mind a critique from a living person who actually reads my work, but I’m damned if some machine is going to analyse my work with any integrity. I’ve taken on board critiques from my Wattpad readers quite happily, I’m not that arrogant that I think I don’t ever make mistakes or can’t improve, but my writing is good. And yes, you’re right…it’s time consuming and not really that productive from my perspective as I write a lot.