What $100K Authors Do Differently

Good data here! Easy to understand with clear strategies.

definitely taking a look at this! thank you for sharing :star:

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Read it and this is very useful and enlightening. Thank you

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Ooh, thanks for sharing this! :grin:

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Subbing

Thanks for sharing Ximera!

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Really good article. The first two are obvious and are related. People here have said it over and over again. Books sell books.

This is what always hits home for me: “There was also a resounding agreement that marketing is hard and is the one area where all authors wanted the most help.” It’s interesting that editing is critical so authors pay for editing. Covers are critical so authors pay for covers. But Marketing is the hardest yet there aren’t (legit) companies offering marketing services.

As to, “Of 100kers, 68% list their most expensive book at or between $3.99 and $5.99, with many of them also having titles that are free or priced at 99c,” are they talking about ebooks? I wish they had made that clear.

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Almost certainly. There’s no way to price a print book that low – and I mean between $3.99 and $5.99.

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Yup. Gotta be about Self Publishing. Majors do not have the author pay for covers or anything else. They supply the artwork, unless of course, it is an illustrated drawing room book, or such like. .

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Read it, thanks for the share.

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Thank you so much for sharing.

Early on in the article, it’s stated that high earners write up to 32 hours per week writing. What does that look like in terms of word count? And do edits, plotting and reviewing feedback count in the 32 hours?

I realize you’re not the one who wrote the article, but would love to hear opinions (from everyone), nonetheless. :smiley:

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I would guess that a big reason for the higher hours among the 100k authors is that they are more likely to be writing full time instead of using it as a side gig.

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Makes sense. :slight_smile:
I was asking, since in the comment section, a person raised the hour issue as well and was told they could still manage to squeeze in the hours even with a job.
It was also mentioned that the word counts of professionals range from 500-1000 a day, and for some even 2000.
I would have thought with 32 hours, they would have managed a lot more. :joy::sweat_smile: Hence, I wondered if they were doing other writing related things in their time.

I would say there are definitely other activities involved for at least some of these authors.

I have also heard of writers (self-published from what I remember) writing 3000+ words an hour. You can apparently get more words down if you use dictation software.

As to spending that amount of time writing on top of a full-time job, it’s possible, but honestly, that’s an intense lifestyle to lead, especially if you have a family. I wouldn’t want to sustain that long term.

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Haha, that’s high. :sweat_smile: I’m a self-confessed slow writer, so the highest would be 1000 per hour on a really good day.

I’ve never heard of this before. Interesting. I can see why speaking would be faster than writing. :smiley:

Indeed.

The professional writers I know tend to split their days. Writing in the morning (for example) and editing and marketing in the afternoon. Everything scheduled, nothing missed.

The word count is new words; it generally doesn’t include editing/rewritten words. And the word count per day varies. Amanda M. Lee does 9000 words per day and releases 20 books a year! 2000 is much more common.

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Bookmarking for later. Thanks for sharing!

A good point. I try to write daily, but it’s not scheduled. Perhaps a more scheduled approach will get better results in terms of productivity and higher word counts.

Wow. That is amazing.

Thank you for replying. :smiley:

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Such an interesting and insightful read! Thank you for linking it here! :slight_smile:

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@MichaelJSullivan once pointed out that if you need to work to pay the bills and want to write a lot, get a job that allows the writing at work, like a night security guard.