What $100K Authors Do Differently

These kinds of jobs are out there, but there rate of compensation is low (as it should be to be honest – you are not providing your employer much value), could have low job security and little hope of career progression. I think if you already have a career, the more sensible thing is to transition to working part time in the same field of work.

The full-time job is not a career. The career is being a novelist. The job pays the bills while pursuing your career. Like an actor being a waiter until his big break.

In my opinion, it’s not a wise thing to do because the odds of being a successful novelist is slim. But it’s a way to write full-time while working to pay bills.

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This. It depends on what the preference is. Funnel everything into the writing career, knowing full well the chances aren’t good (to put it mildly). Or get a life and start writing on the side, expanding if it works. The latter takes more time. But especially the younger authors here have all the time in the world. I would say get a solid base and take it from there. If writing doesn’t pan out, there’s something to fall back to.

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Exactly! I doubt the $100K writers quit their jobs and began their full-time writing career with their first book. They worked into it, and once enough money was coming in, took a chance and stepped into it full-time.

Even if you write full-time, you aren’t guaranteed an income. Best to make sure you have a solid fanbase before you take that leap.

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I’m kind of surprised to see the amount of new authors pricing their book above ten dollars. Isn’t it only logical that you’ll sell less if you price high? Or is it compensation for only having one or two stories, in hopes sales make up for the money they put into it?

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I expect the latter. Plus, new writers tend to either write novellas or TOMES. So they figure if they’re putting our 350K words, they should be paid commensurately. (Remember how Schuyler used to argue for that?)

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He’s very hard to forget, even with amnesia. Especially the relationship with his editor.

How come it’s either novellas or tomes? I’ve noticed I fall into the novella category myself, and cannot imagine writing a story that’s over 100k or even 200k words. Is it because beginning writers/authors don’t quite know how to cut unnecessary things or add more than just the bare bones?

And would readers actually want a big, expensive book of an unknown author? If it’s an author you know and love, then you can guess the price is worth it. If it’s an unknown author, even if he or she charges less for the same size, I’d still be willing to pay less for it, simply because it’s a gamble that may not pay off.

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Yep. They haven’t learned that part of the craft yet. (But, yanno, go ahead and publish your masterpiece!)

No, readers don’t want to pay a lot of money for an author they don’t know. Heck, I’ve almost completely stopped buying traditionally published books because I perceive them as bloody overpriced.

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Part of it is a trick. If you have an e-book, priced at - say: 4.99, then having the hardcover or paperback version next to it at 15.99 makes it look like a good bargain I checked out a lot of publishers recently for the submission and there’s a lot who seem to think people will buy books that way.

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I’m not sure I give publishers that much credit. Were those publishers you checked out using POD or doing print runs? POD is less risky, but it prices the books overly-high.

It’s actually the ebook prices that surprise me. Traditional publishers usually WAY overprice ebooks. Or were those sale prices? I’d expect reasonable ebook prices from smaller indie publishers – just like I’d expect them to do POD for print.

I expect you already know why… partly it’s bigger overheads than indies (offices in downtown Manhattan, for instance) and partly it’s a misguided attempt to stop ebooks from cutting into print sales. They (mostly) control who sells a lot in print, but they don’t (and can’t) control who sells well in ebook.

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So much for over-saturation concerns.

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Thank you for sharing.

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Very insightful post. Thanks for sharing.

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