What's wrong with definitions in blurb summaries?


#1
  • Nothing, dear.
  • Nothing at all.

0 voters

if the poll options don’t align with your thoughts, comment below.


#2

I feel like they don’t talk about what the actual plot is. Especially if it’s just that and no summary.


#3

ah. i personally find the lack of details to be raw. but good raw. Like sushi


#4

Eh, preferences are preferences. They’re kinda pointless to me.


#5

preferences or definition blurbs?


#6

Definition blurbs xD


#7

oh okay

im dumb .dun judge


#8

What do you mean by definitions? Do you mean something like this: cat - Furry domesticated pet that is master of humans.

To me if that’s all the blurb is, it tells me nothing about the story. I read the blurb to get an idea of what is in the book. I need to know who the MC is at the very least and get a sense of the why. A definition on it’s own doesn’t do that for me. It’s a lot like an excerpt only blurb so I wouldn’t pick up a book if that’s all I saw.


#9

i feel like the word chosen to be defined says a lot about the story. like if the story was called cat, and the blurb was as you said, i think that’d tell us that this will either involve absurdist humor or follow something involving cats as masters of humans and that’s gud enuf ykno


#10

Depends on the execution imo.


#11

yea dats tru


#12

Honestly, to me there would be no context to the word chosen. If it’s a word made up specific to the book then okay, but if it’s just a common word why would I care? It would just come off as trying too hard to be different. I prefer traditional blurbs. It has to be something truly special to draw me in otherwise.


#13

I can see one instance where this would work really well.

lumi (n.): a person who [blah blah blah]

Like if you do a parody of a dictionary definition but you define your character in it.

That could be compelling to read, especially if it’s done well.


#14

Eh, seen it too many times it doesn’t intrigue me. Especially when it’s a word I already know the meaning of. Ugh.


#15

the word is usually contextualised cus its the book title most of the time. i think. i haven’t really checked them all.


#16

dis gud idea.


#17

ohohoh but do you know the meaning of mauerbauertraurigkeit???


#18

I think it kind of depends. I don’t find anything wrong with a definition IN a summary, but AS a summary is a whole other issue. The whole point of a summary is to summarize what the story is about. If you don’t explain what it is about, then you’re kind of risking a chance to gain potential readers.

Just like excerpts. There is nothing wrong with putting it in a summary, but using it as a summary is an issue because it doesn’t tell your audience what it’s about.


#19

I’d prefer that over the “in which” trend.


#20

I wonder if anyone noticed I mocked the “in which” trend in one of my thread titles.