What's your favorite Horror Movie and why?


#101

Slashera are made just to laugh at. You need that every now and again :wink:


#102

You know though, it would be so much freakier if the slasher actually had a good heart, and could be on the hero’s side given a different context.

Or even, they’re preordianed but they resist or die trying not to be one.


#103

Sounds like a happier Jigsaw lol :joy:


#104

Yea basically.


#105

That was definitely one of my favorite scenes! I thought it was done perfectly.


#106

IT wasn’t as scary as the book was, kinda edging towards more creepy and spooky fun in my opinion, but I still enjoyed it for what it was. However, those scenes with Beverly and her father were something else. I don’t remember the last time when I’ve felt frozen solid in a theater chair with chills running through my back.


#107

That’s what I live about the new IT. That amount of tension. A lot of movies nowadays don’t have that.

I also liked the little things in the movie like when there’s that scene is the alleyway. In the background, you see the titles of the movies playing and it’s based from the year, which is awesome. It was the little things like that I appreciated.

And I agree, it’s not as creepy as the book, but I think it wasn’t a bad movie. I enjoyed it for what it was


#108

Weirdly enough, I don’t consider The Sixth Sense to be a horror movie. Definitely a ghost story, but not horror per se. The tone is completely off for a horror movie. It doesn’t try to freak us out with semi-constant jump scares or gross us out with Grand Guignol-level blood and atrocity. As I look back on it even now, the tone seems to be…gentle, even with the few moments of blood and actual or implied violence. The idea that all these ghosts were and still are people is decidedly uncommon in the genre.


#109

There’s a few favorites of the horror genre for me.

An American Werewolf In London: This one gets the nod mainly because it deals with not just the teeth-and-claws aspect of lycanthropy, it also touches on those moments when the werewolf isn’t running around eating people. Yeah, it definitely mixes a lot of comedy into the mix, but the dream sequences alone put a fresh spin on the myth.

Lord of Illusions: Everybody immediately thinks of Hellraiser or maybe Nightbreed when you mention Clive Barker. What’s interesting is the way Barker adapts the story to the screen. The short story was surreal and weird with trappings of a New York-style noir detective story. The screen version mixes magic (which normal people shouldn’t probably be touching) with Southern California’s history of crazed cults and messianic personalities and works in a layer faintly echoing Chinatown. Probably one of Barker’s most underrated films.

The Thing: I’d say this does something Alien doesn’t manage to do, despite the bigger budget and H.R. Giger’s production design work. The Thing plays on basic human instincts, and turns them against the audience. With Alien, you know it’s an obvious threat of the “big and pissed off” variety. With The Thing, there is no certainty till the very end, and not even then if recent articles on the subject are any indication.

Silver Bullet: Yes, it’s another werewolf movie, but this one’s played totally straight (though it probably owes a debt to John Landis for borrowing the “lycanthrope having weird dreams” trope). My only quibble: they needed somebody less buff than Everett McGill to player the preacher. If they were redoing it, Bob Odenkirk or Tim Blake Nelson might be a good casting choice.


#110

I’ve only seen the first Ring (unless you count the Japanese films it was based on, of which I’ve seen 3) but I have to say it’s still one of my favorites, too. And I’ve gotta agree about Jacob’s Ladder, an interesting movie and creepy! Have you seen it yet, OP?
I like some ghost stories, too, like The Others, Sixth Sense, and Woman in Black.
I haven’t seen many recent horror films at all, sadly. I want to see the new IT, even though I didn’t care for the book as much as some of King’s other stuff.


#111

I haven’t seen Jacob’s Ladder yet. I’ve been very busy… I might do tonight if I have time to be honest. Thank you for reminding me :slight_smile:

The Japanese films of the Ring are the ones I watch. he first English one was alright, but I wasn’t a fan of the others.

Jacob’s Ladder seems familiar. I may have watched it, but my memory is a little hazy. The synopsis sounds familiar…


#113

After seeing the first scene, I remembered I have seen it before. Re-watching it because why not? :slight_smile:


#114

Nice! It’s been a while since I checked it out myself but I remember really liking it, despite how weird it is. It was apparently one of the films that inspired aspects of the Silent Hill series. You ever play those games?


#115

Yup. I played them when they came out. I loved those games along with the original Resident Evil games. I got very addicted to Resident Evil 2. I memorized the placement of everything in that game :confused:


#116

I was the same way but with SH :grin: Love those games. RE is good too!


#117

The Descent. I understood it had sequels but I never got around to watching them. But that one is probably my favorite.


#118

My favourite movie is probably A Nightmare on Elm Street (the Original) and Dream Warriors

I just like the fact that Freddy is not your average slasher, (but I’m a sucker for plots about serial killers). Also, the idea of something killing you in your dreams is horrifying, and it ages well as you can’t exactly call the Police and say,

“Help! There’s a scary man in my dreams that’s trying to kill me!”

I have to say though, that the remake made me lose faith in humanity, I mean seriously YOU HAD THE INGREDIENTS TO MAKE A PREQUEL AND YOU REMADE SOMETHING THAT DIDN’T NEED REMAKING.

As some of you have said, it’s when CGI is used and it looks worse than practical makeup.

aka Le 2010 Remake!

Lets out a breath. Hopefully, these people don’t think I’m insane

@DoraTonks

For the love of everything holy, DON’T watch The Descent sequel! It RUINS the first one!


#119

Then I won’t. I’ll keep the first in my mind, and it’s even more special since I saw it during its theatrical run.


#120

I love The Babadook. A lot more meaning than your typical horror movie! And when the picture book comes back… shudders


#121

Nightmare on Elm Street 3 was the first real horror movie I ever saw and I didn’t sleep for weeks – mostly because Freddy always visits you in your dreams! That will always rank as my scariest horror experience … and my favorite horror movie.