why is it taking so long for people to get woke?

discussion
world
#163

Okay, this thread has the potential to be positive, so I’m going to engage with people who I can meet at a humane level. If you wanna join us there, the key’s under the mat.

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#164

True. I always get so triggered when I see videos of minorities being racist to other minorities. I guess it all originates from the idea that superiority = power and the more superior you are, the more power you obtain.

Well, it isn’t exactly based on ‘nothingness’. It’s based on racial stereotypes, stigmas, etc. Most of them in which are rebunked when you get to know someone of the group. But, yeah. I get it. It’s infuriating that a person thinks it’s okay to judge someone solely off representations of them which then are based on opinions, not facts.

2 Likes
#165

For anyone who actually cares to do proper research and reading.

  • Backlash by Susan Faludi.
  • Towards a Political Philosophy of Race by Falguni A. Sheth.
  • The Color of Law by Richard Rothstein.
  • Neoreaction a Basilisk by Elizabeth Sandifer.
  • The Will to Change by Bell Hooks.

If YouTube videos are more your speed:

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#166

Bro, we’re all trying to reach an understanding. We’re all trying to reach a happy and positive ending but if you thought this thread was going to end positive, man, with a controversial discussion like this, it’s near impossible. We’re all humane, we all have opinions because we’re humane. Don’t say people aren’t being ‘humane’ because their opinion is different to yours.

#167

I meant “nothingness” more as their reasons are based on nothingness. As you said, stereotypes and stigmas.

I deal with this a lot from people in my hometown. I went to a college with a lot of diversity and made friends from all over. And even here on Wattpad, I have friends from all different races, religions, and cultures.

But my little town is very narrow-minded and I hear people say horrible things sometimes. I’m like, “I know someone who is that religion” and “I actually have friends who are that race” and I know what they’re saying isn’t true. But it doesn’t matter what I say, some people just won’t listen.

Most will. Surprisingly, most people will come around. But there’s always a few bad apples.

I do think with every generation, this issue is getting better. I hope everyone agrees with that. There of course will always be racists, sexists, all of the other -ists out there. But as a whole, I think our world is moving in the right direction. Slowly but surely.

#168

I think you’re confusing ‘humane’ with the word ‘human.’

#169

Oh, definitely. Millenials and the Gen Z generation are definitely way more accepting than past generations. I 100% agree with that.

#170

Shhhhh… She’s very tired.

#171

:((( are you guys insinuating i’m a… dumbass??

#172

Just for the sake of clarity, this stat is false, but so is the rebuttal that these crimes are often drug-related. Here’s more information: https://crime-data-explorer.fr.cloud.gov/explorer/national/united-states/crime/2007/2017

A plurality of American offenders are white, according to the most recent stats I found during a quick search. Less than half were black.
Most offenses are weapons related, not drug-related.

I believe the 50% to 13% rhetoric stems from a misstated comparison of the volume of violent crime per capita in each racial group. This is a valid angle but an incomplete one. Scholars show evidence there is a correlation between violent crime and situations that make crime more likely, such as poverty. The plethora of research supporting this aside, it passes the common sense test.

Over 45% of young black children live in poverty, according to the State of Working America fact sheet. That number is rising due to increasing income inequality. Even when accounting for convergence of college attainment, high school test scores, and life expectancy between whites and blacks, there has been little progress toward income equality. In other words, all factors being equal, blacks and whites are still not getting equal pay. This is a byproduct of racism (and that other unpleasant word, privilege.)

Just wanted to clear that up. Carry on.

2 Likes
#173

Shh shhh. Much tired. Very sleep.

#174

that grammar :heart_eyes:

#175

They’re just saying that you made a mistake. It’s human. It doesn’t lower your intellect.

#176

i know

i was being sarcastic

#177

I like to remember that proxy has a lot of power to change people’s minds.

People are more likely to listen to people similar to them, and that’s where allyship (?) comes into play.

It might be an almost miraculous fit for me to discuss racism with people on the internet because their cynicism kicks in. But I could probably come to some common consensus with say, a transphobic feminist because I’m a cis woman who’s also a feminist.

It sucks, but ‘in group’, ‘out-group’ thinking is how we’re wired into to society.

1 Like
#178

Well, then…

#179

He’s being rude.

That wasn’t my intention. :slight_smile:

#180

Sigh, I’m a writer, I should know how to use words. You’re right, humane isn’t the right one. But it is the imbalance of talking to someone who comes into a conversation with lower stakes and less incentive to engage as opposed to presenting counterarguments. And the idea of a debate is such a slippery slope.

Can you debate an experience? Can you debate visible issues with concrete consequences? Maybe, but I think you’re better off having a conversation with people who are already aware of the lingo, and those who want to learn can pick up on that where it makes sense and ask questions for the sole purpose of understanding where it does not. But having to explain fundamental concepts (while they’re actively being picked at) keeps things at such a basic level that really no change comes out of that.

There’s a difference between talking to someone you can safely disagree with and talking to someone who sees your words as ammunition.

3 Likes
#181

This is false and/or misleading. According to the United States Sentencing Commission, black male offenders continue to receive sentences an average of 19.1 percent longer than similarly situated white males. Also per them, violence in an offender’s history does not appear to account for the demographic differences in sentencing. For reference, see here: https://www.ussc.gov/research/research-reports/demographic-differences-sentencing

1 Like
#182

I appreciate that you’re taking the time to deconstruct this for them, but this has turned into a back and forth where you’re trying to get someone to the same ground at you so you can even start a discussion.

You might be here a while.

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