Writers Struggle Hangout Three: Rant, Ask, Encourage, Vent etc

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discussion

#9187

I’d have someone introduce them so the other character knows. Like, have an advisor introduce them. I kinda write my monarchies as how the monarchy works in the real world: Queen Elizabeth, Prince Harry, Princess Mary of Denmark.

So for my fantasy story Lion Hearted, Nico – the rightful prince and one of the MCs – has the full name of Nicholas Athæm of Aldora, but he is addressed as Prince Nicholas.


#9188

I mean, how will monarchs address normal citizens? One that is from a different country, no less. If it’s the character’s own country, I could just have her say “citizen”. From a different country, it seems a bit more complicated.


#9189

Is the citizen not in the monarchy?


#9190

The citizen is in a monarchy country, but the monarch in question is not the sovereign of said citizen. For example, let’s say a period where both French and English monarchs existed as sovereigns. How will, say, the Queen of England address a French citizen(that doesn’t have any titles)?


#9191

By their first name? :joy:

I mean, if the French citizen is considered a sovereign, then they have a title…


#9192

Thank you for the advice! The blunt criticism was very much appreciated. My stories are both still in their early stages of planning, so I hadn’t created a schedule to work on each respectively. Your response was very helpful in regards to the “dropping projects” rut I was in.


#9193

Well, I’m extremely confused about that matter. I considered first name, but back in those days first name was considered being on “familiar terms”, and it could cause serious controversy. Mr. insert last name is a no go either, since monarchs shouldn’t add honorifics to someone unless it’s another ruler(or someone with a title, like Sir Hood). Man, monarchies sure was a weird business…


#9194

Your entire situation got me mad confused. Like, if they’re both sovereigns, they should be addressed as sovereigns. If one is considered a sovereign ruler and has no title, then they’re not a sovereign.


#9195

No no, there’s only ONE sovereign in this situation. The French citizen I had raised in the example is just a normal dude. Not a ruler, minister, aristocrat, none of that. Just some random french guy without high social standing.


#9196

So your situation is a sovereign trying to address a peasant?


#9197

Normally, a monarch or dignitary from another country would refer to a citizen not under their command by their profession: Kind Tailor. Stalwart Soldier. etc


#9198

Children get a pass, as monarchs are generally seen to be matronly or patronly to all youth. So My child, or young lady / young man


#9199

Kinda, yeah. In this case the person is a professor without much standing in society, and the monarch is conversing with them. The professor introduced himself with the last name of Drake, so what should the monarch call him? Because, Professor Drake isn’t a citizen of the monarch’s nation.


#9200

Yeah, I’d just call him Drake.


#9201

Hm…so something like just “Professor”, then?


#9202

You just said it. They would call him Professor Drake. :slight_smile:


#9203

Man, the middle ages sure was a hassle and a half. I spent the entire Saturday researching succession laws, and I went insane after getting just gravelkind down.


#9204

Monarchs look at functions within a society. They default to what they know. If someone didn’t have an appreciable profession, but they owned land, they would be Landowner. Someone in the potential marriage pool might be Dowrer.


#9205

Okay, so, here’s another question. Is it possible for a princess to be the sovereign? Instead of automatically becoming queen, is it technically possible for a princess to be in power, and being referred to as Your Majesty instead of Your Highness?


#9206